Portland


Press Publish ~ Portland. Celi’s there you know. Hers was the first blog I followed when first starting mine in May of 2011. Her blog is a treat. If you haven’t already you should check it out. Some sessions will be live streamed, you have to register for tickets. Her session will begin at 1:45. There will also be so many helpful sessions, I hope to catch this one, as I am new to WordPress Premium.  I am a little excited. crab apples in a bunch Here is my very first post, have you read it? It seems so long ago, so much has happened since that day in May. There have been failures and unexpected successes. Moments to embrace and lessons in letting go. Through it all, I have laughed, cried, and learned. Delightfully alive. Be well, Jess

Going…going…will it be gone?


Winter. Just another of life’s adventures; fraught  with roller coaster temperatures and seemingly insurmountable layers of snow and ice. A journey that forced us inside, inside ourselves to ponder our dreams and the roads we have already traveled. To navigate our paths, or wander serendipitously, our minds open to what could be. DSC_6138

Something about the near hibernation plummets me into retrospect, a desire to reroute my intended destination; to find joy in my journey, succumb to the stillness.    Be. DSC_6142 It has faded , winter; I struggle to rectify the inside with the out. I listen to melody of my past, believing the best is yet to come. Fresh beginnings, new goals, bright dreams; they are all there in the song. A song of sweet nothings. DSC_6140 I delight in the sweet nothings now, the season slowed me enough to recognize contentment in the ordinary. The sunrise, the sunset, skyping with my husband 10 thousand miles away, puppy kisses, baby giggles, or a llama’s whiffle; these are gifts that could slip by without being noticed, aren’t they? Keep your eyes and your heart open lest you miss life’s beauty. DSC_6129 Some of the best moments are the simplest. Be well, catch the moments and hold on tight. Jess

Way Back Wordless Wednesday


Well, actually it was just last year.  A beautiful mostly unspoiled place to be ~ St. Croix USVI.

St. Croix vacation. DSC_2886

 

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DSC_3088Fly away…

Fort in Frederiksted DSC_3113

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Buck Island

Hello turtle.DSC_3597

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Urban jungle…DSC_3170

Fanfare.DSC_3407

DSC_3253                                               Annalay Bay Tidal Pools, a pleasant hike along Trumball Trail.

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DSC_3124                                                     View from the top of Goat Hill, a one mile hike. 

 

Video compliments of Josh Cookfair. 

Be Well,

Jess

Barns of the mid-west at 55 mph…


“I have found out that there ain’t any surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.” – Mark Twain

I know good team work when I see it.

In the future, I may need to make it a point to embark, with friends on a trip to test our compatibility. Because if you can make it on the road dealing with logistic snafus, idiosyncratic nuances, digestive challenges, utilizing your Travel IQ, overcoming car breath (ya, know, the I have been in this car for 24 hours with no tooth-brush breath) and physical dissimulation, well, you can deal with the more mundane daily issues of life. And I firmly believe that. But, no, there was no test drive, so, let’s just do this!

We (8) were heading to Iowa from NH, Connecticut and the Capital Region of New York. The logistics of that alone may be staggering to some, hold on though, we had llamas in tow, they all had to get to Dakota Ridge Farm, then they had to fit in one trailer. One trailer, at one farm, so that we could leave at one time! They arrived in vans, well 2 vans, and a trailer; The Trailer. The one and only trailer. Do you see a problem yet?, Nope, me neither.

Load’em up

We’ve all arrived at DRF, everyone with their llamas, showing paraphernalia, clothing, water bowls, llamas, hay, coolers, blow-dryers, tents, health certifications (the llamas, not ours), muck boots, llamas, show boots…pillows, don’t forget the pillows. Yes, all of this has to go in one trailer. No worries, I know a good team when I see one. Paul and Todd have the spatial relations to configure a viable traveling equipment formation – did you get all that? Of course, we were to leave by 8:00, it is now 10:00, but what are a few hours spent in the company of friends.

And Head ‘em out

This travel adventure takes extraordinary determination, chutzpah, daring, grit, and even some intestinal fortitude… Are you up for it? Well come along as we hit the road.

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What a wonderful trip, last June, with wonderful friends. We hope to do it again this year!

Jenn with her favorite girl(Llama) at the Iowa fair-grounds. (a very, very pregnant girl)
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Be well,
Jess

Ready for Rhinebeck?


 

We are heading to the most fabulous Sheep and Wool Festival.

Dutchess County Fairgrounds in Upstate New York hosts a spectacular fiber festival in October chock full of breeds, breeders,competitions, demonstrations, and lots and lots of fiber!

Andy will be coming along.


KatDoll will be going to the fair, Jenni wouldn’t go with out her…

There will be all manner of furry, fuzzy, fluffy friends;  Angora goats, all breeds of sheep, to Alpacas and of course llamas.  My favorite breeds of sheep are the long wools, WensleydaleTeeswater…and Leicester long wool.  I dream of  owning a few myself.  Perhaps at the fair, I can meet the right breeders (fingers crossed).

A friends sheep…too cute.

Jenni and I have been working on ideas for our stall display, we (Howie) have built several over the course of the years, but for Llama shows,not for fiber shows, and they must be different, I think.
Here is Andy sticking his head through our last display ~ in the making…guess he couldn’t wait.

I am thinking I should tap Josh’s creativity( Daughter’s boyfriend, Josh Cookfair ) being a phenomenal graphic artist and skilled at the art of branding ~ I am certain I could use his input. My daughter Juli is a talented illustrator…Jenni can structurally design just abut anything; Howie can build anything, so I think we will figure something out!

I will be sure to show you our end product.

We have much to do, grooming, planning designing and such…

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ndy has grown so much over the summer, I will take a few shots of him and try to post them tomorrow…sweet, sweet boy; still miss his Mamma. (You can read a bit about her here..) He was barely 3 months old when she passed.

 

Be well,

Jess

 

Did you stay ~ while I was away…


Well, hello there! Welcome to Martha’s Vineyard.

We needed to escape…leave our worries and cares behind. We hopped on a ferry and in just a 45-minutes  from Woods Hole on Cape Cod, the Vineyard with its serene features, pristine sandy beaches, sand dunes and oodles and oodles of natural beauty waited.

Heading out to the other side(southerly) of the Island we left much of the commercial tourist traps behind (though not entirely). A few shops owned by the native people could supply needed trinkets and souvenirs.
Getting there was relatively stress free; an economical, convenient bus service from Oaks Bluffs ~ “Up Island” to the rural community of Aquinnah, formerly known as Gay Head,home to the Wampanoag**.

Once there we found the dramatic, color-streaked Aquinnah Cliffs. Walking along the narrow path of scrub bushes, down to the rocky shore is one of the most beautiful walks you will ever take. If you choose to, you can walk to the right toward the clay cliffs… you will encounter Jungle Beach, clothing optional. (oh, Dear)

Driving back through the winding country roads, many with stone fences and lush vegetation, reminded me of rural Ireland.


The cliffs are cherished by the Wampanoag tribe, who love to tell people about the importance of the cliffs to the tribe, and how they feature prominently in their spirituality and myths.

In 1997, the town changed its name to Aquinnah, which is Wampanoag for “land under the hill.”

MOSHUP TRAIL was completed in 1958 and follows the south shore across the dunes to an exit near the lighthouse. So important is Moshup that the main Aquinnah town road along the shore has been named after him. When Moshup envisioned Europeans coming to his fishing grounds, he is said to have left Aquinnah. He then changed his children into killer whales, turned his pets into stone, and with his wife Squant walked down the beach to disappear behind Zack’s Cliffs. Fog today is attributed to the smoke of Moshup’s peudelee (pipe). Cries heard off the south side during a storm are said to be Squant calling to her lost children.

The Cliffs are ecologically protected, and it is forbidden to climb the cliffs or even touch the clay.

THE AQUINNAH CLIFFS are one hundred and fifty feet of sediment – including red and white clays, green sands, white quartz, black organic soil, and lignite. They tell the story of the past hundred million years one colorful layer at a time.

The streaks of red in the Cliff are from the blood of whales that Moshup would drag onto the Cliffs to cook. The discarded remains from his table are now fossilized deep in the clay. To the Wampanoag, the Aquinnah Cliffs are a sacred spot for the very reason that Moshup chose this special place as his home – they are a watchful place of great bounties.

The ocean is a rare aqua color here, and the waves are quite high.

**The ancestors of Wampanoag people have lived for at least 10,000 years at Aquinnah (Gay Head) and throughout the island of Noepe (Martha’s Vineyard), pursuing a traditional economy based on fishing and agriculture. The Aquinnah Wampanoag share the belief that the giant Moshup created Noepe and the neighboring islands, taught our people how to fish and to catch whales, and still presides over our destinies. Our beliefs and a hundred million years of history are imprinted in the colorful clay cliffs of Aquinnah.


As we boarded the ferry for our ride back to the mainland, a beautiful, bright full move eased out from its cover of clouds…the photo taken without flash, I think gives the best feeling and likeness of the night. We were tired and content.

I hope you are well,
Jess

Have you ever…?


Have you ever just taken a drive, to see where the road takes you? As we meandered about on the back roads of Greenwhich; a hamlet near to our home.

We stopped by a local ice cream shop; drove through the town center and headed west. As we rounded a bend in the road along the Battenkill River, we came upon some local history ~ in the shape of a painted brick colonial home…

A few miles west of East Greenwich, also on the banks of the Batten Kill, is the hamlet of Battenville.

The home where Susan B. Anthony [the woman suffrage movement who’s motto was,”Men their rights and nothing more, women their rights and nothing less] spent part of her formative years has since been restored, as has the adjoining building which served as a tavern and stagecoach stop.

I am sure it was restored, but it seems to have fallen back into disrepair. An abandoned bit of historical architecture…

This area was also important to the underground Railroad; The abolition of slavery was a cause that many local people were actively involved in. Dr. Hiram Corliss guided the movement in Greenwich. His son, George Corliss, was the inventor of the Corliss Steam Engine. Legend has it;an important station of the Underground Railway to Canada was located in Greenwich.

The Battenville area was used during parts of the filming of The Horse Whisperers.

We had to stop to get this fella headed in the right direction…

In researching this homestead, I found the info here: Greenwich, NY.

Where are you headed? Have you ever…?

Be well,
Jessica